Terrorist Stress is Paralyzing Our Lives

ATLANTA, GA – August 11, 2006

Terrorist Stress is Paralyzing Our Lives

Conquer the stress of long airport security lines, delays, and fear of terror threats

The fear of flying is escalating daily. The increase of global terrorist threats, and heightened terror alerts are causing Americans to question aviation security. According to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation, for a 12-month period ending in May 2006, 658 million passengers traveled on U.S. flights.As viral fear runs rampant, we must choose to create a sense of control.

Dr. Kathleen Hall, the leading international expert on stress and crisis management, offers the following techniques to manage the stress of travel terrorism:

  1. Shift Gears: Choose to be a hero not a victim. Terrorism is bullying, it is all about power. Refuse to feel helpless, hopeless and isolated! We are all in this together.Community and family create strength, and decrease stress. Look around you and see if someone needs your help. This evokes a condition we call “helper’s high.”
  2. Stress Management Tools are Critical.When security lines are long, patience runs thin. Learn simple stress reduction tools then teach them to others. If an incident were to occur when you are traveling, and you have equipped yourself with stress reduction practices you can then become the teacher in any situation and help your fellow travelers.
  3. The Power of Surrender: Not to the terrorists, but surrender to waiting, being herded and uncertainty. Surrender restores your balance and personal power. Trust those in charge of the situation. Listen to their instructions and don’t fight the system of rules in this current tense situation.Patience and cooperation should be your mantra.
  4. Contagious Stress: Individuals who experience a higher degree of stress are often in danger of unintentionally spreading their “condition” to other travelers.When someone is stressed there is a ripple effect. Stress becomes viral. Therefore it is important to learn stress reduction techniques to prevent contagious stress from spreading.
  5. Talk About It: Talk with others about your fears. You will experience; trust, support and calm when you share your feelings with others. This is an opportunity to be compassionate and share hope
What About the Kids?
  1. Safety and Security. Get your child something to cuddle. A toy, blanket, teddy bear; these help them feel safe and secure and anchors them.
  2. Touch Your Child. Hold your child or at least hold their hand. Physical touch reassures your child and makes them feel safe. Look into the eyes of your child when you touch them.
  3. Reassure Your Child. As you touch your child and look into their eyes say, “We are in this together, we are safe and everything will be all right.”
  4. Talk and Listen. Talk with your child giving them simple accurate information. Listen to what your child says and their questions. Mirror your child’s question so your child is assured that you heart their fears and you are present and reassuring.