Learn from Reality TV Divorces

The media is abuzz with the recent news of Kim Kardashian’s sudden divorce after only 72 days of marriage. Whether you are a fan of American reality television or not, there is a lesson American couples can learn from the sudden demise of this Hollywood love affair: Don’t be hasty entering or ending a marriage because reality TV divorces are what people watch for.

Listed below are four things that can be learned from reality TV divorces.

  1. Marriage checkup. America’s divorce rate is one of the highest in the world (50 percent). Unfortunately, the major news outlets report that nearly two-thirds of marriages ended without the couples trying counseling. To keep a relationship healthy experts suggest getting a “marriage checkup.” You wouldn’t wait until your health was on the brink before going to the doctor and you shouldn’t wait until your relationship has serious problems before seeking therapy.
  2. Couple time. Carving out “couple time” in your busy schedules can also help your relationship. Experts say that having a date night once a week can save your sex life and your marriage. On the other hand, money is said to be one of the top reasons relationships began to fail. Reconsidering how the finances are handled (one account or separate accounts) could help.
  3. Plan a getaway. Taking a vacation together (without the children) may be put your marriage on the way to recovery. Pick a relaxing destination that allows you to focus on your problems. You could choose an island thousands of miles away or a romantic bed-n-breakfast in the next town. The goal is to bring a list of issues you wish to discuss and then reconnect and return home with a plan to repair your relationship.
  4. Redefine the relationship. If all else fails Professor Pamela Haag, author of Marriage Confidential, says instead of finding a way to “fit” into the typical marriage try redefining the marriage so that it fits you. What does she mean by this? Haag says that more couples are giving separate beds or bedrooms a chance before considering divorce. And updating your wedding vows every few years with realistic goals and compromises may also keep your marriage afloat.